Thursday, November 15, 2018

Minimising Rotator Cuff Injuries



Most people use their shoulder joints on a daily basis without thinking about it. However, if you have ever experienced a rotator cuff injury, you know that it can be quite painful. A shoulder injury can significantly limit the motion in your arm and shoulder for long periods of time, making sports, work and even sleep difficult. Rotator cuff injuries are one of the most common causes of shoulder pain in adults of all age groups, but especially affect those over 40 because these injuries occur from long-term, repeated overhead motions in sports or at work. People that most frequently experience rotator cuff injuries are those with occupations requiring heavy and forceful lifting or repeated overuse, such as carpenters and painters, and serious athletes who compete on a professional or semi-professional level. 

What is the rotator cuff?

The rotator cuff is comprised of a group of muscles and tendons that work together to hold the shoulder joint in place. The rotator cuff stabilises the ball of the shoulder within the shoulder joint and assists in the motions of lifting and rotating the arm. Whenever you move your shoulder, your rotator cuff goes into action.

What exactly causes rotator cuff injuries?

A number of things can inflict damage on the rotator cuff. In some cases, an injury such as a fall can cause a strain on or tears in the rotator cuff. When a tear occurs, it is often located in the rotator cuff tendons. These are the tissues that connect the muscles and bones.
Tears may also result from chronic overuse or degeneration of the tendon due to normal age-related wear. Tears can be partial or full-thickness. A partial tear damages the tendon but does not sever it completely. Sometimes a tendon becomes frayed due to a partial tear and, over time, progresses to a full tear. A full thickness tear can result in significant disabilities.


What are the risk factors?

Really almost anyone can suffer from a rotator cuff injury under the right circumstances. However, certain segments of the population are more likely to experience this type of injury.


  • Athletes who use a repetitive motion on a regular basis, including baseball pitchers, tennis players and archers
  • Construction workers who frequently use overhead repetitive motions, including house painters and carpenters
  • People over 40
  • Anyone who has a family history of rotator cuff injuries

What are the symptoms of a rotator cuff injury?

If you’ve suffered a rotator cuff injury, you most likely will experience shoulder pain radiating down your arm. The pain may be more prevalent when you are reaching, lifting or otherwise participating in overhead activities. You may also experience enough pain to keep you awake at night if you try to sleep on the affected side. Your arm could become weak and cause you to experience difficulty with routine activities, such as putting a shirt on or combing your hair. Depending on the severity of the tear, you may experience a significant and debilitating amount of pain. However, some rotator cuff injuries produce no symptoms at all.

How are rotator cuff injuries diagnosed?

Rotator cuff injuries are typically diagnosed by a doctor during a physical examination. The doctor may move your arm into various positions and press on different areas of your shoulder. The doctor may also test the amount of your strength in your shoulder areas and arms. In some cases, the doctor may recommend that the following imaging tests be performed:


  • X-ray tests can be useful in visualising potential causes for your pain, such as bone spurs. However, an actual rotator cuff tear will not show up in an X-ray.
  • An ultrasound uses sound waves to produce a picture of body parts that are being tested. These tests are very effective on soft-tissue areas, such as muscles and tendons. They are also dynamic, meaning that they are able to take images as the shoulder is moving. Ultrasound images are also useful for comparing images of the affected shoulder to a healthy shoulder.
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) tests combine radio waves with a strong magnetic field to produce very detailed images. Such images are capable of displaying the complete shoulder structure in great detail.


What can I do to minimise my risks of injuring or re-injuring myself?

There are a number of things that you can do to minimise the occurrence of rotator cuff injuries.


  • Change your daily activities: 
  • When a rotator cuff tears, the damage can get worse over time, especially if you continue to participate in the same activities that contributed to the injury in the first place. To minimise further damage, you should avoid activities that are suspect.
  • Wear a shoulder brace that provides extra support and stability: 
  • Such products are popular with athletes and individuals who are working in jobs where rotator cuff injuries are common. The braces are designed to provide light but firm compression in order to counteract tissue swelling. Some of these products, such as the Thermoskin Adjustable Shoulder with V Stabiliser, are actually endorsed by the Australian Physiotherapy Association and the Australian Institute of Sport.
  • Stretch and strengthen your shoulders, arms and chest: 
  • In addition to focusing on your shoulders, it’s just as important to strengthen the muscles around your shoulder blade and in the back of your shoulder in order to achieve optimum shoulder muscle balance. 


Long-term treatment without surgery.  

Treating a rotator cuff injury without surgery typically involves treating the pain and working to restore the function of the shoulder and the rotator cuff as much as possible. This usually includes avoiding the activities that tend to aggravate the shoulder and participating in physical therapy and special exercises as laid out in a recovery plan.
To aid in the pain management and recovery in between physiotherapy appointments, the use of a thermal support, such as the Adjustable Shoulder Stabiliser helps not only to increase blood circulation, recovery and reduce associated pain, but also helps to remind of mobility restrictions and help prevent reinjury.

Friday, October 19, 2018

Thermoskin Ankle Brace Product Review

Finding the Right Ankle Brace for Your Needs

It can be challenging to find a universal brace to manage and treat injuries or chronic conditions. To recover quickly, it's important to choose the right brace the first time. We offer a range of ankle braces designed to offer relief from acute injuries, arthritis, ankle instability and more.

Braces that Supply Heat

1. The Thermoskin Ankle Gauntlet can be worn continuously to generate heat in order to provide temporary relief from pain associated with diabetic neuropathy, Rynaud's Disease and arthritic conditions. The thermal treatment from this brace is most effective when the product is worn for long periods.

2. The Thermoskin AFG Stabiliser brace provides heat to increase blood flow to the affected parts of the ankle and foot. The heat generated by this bandage improves circulation to help treat pain associated with diabetic neuropathy, Rynaud's Disease and foot-related arthritic conditions. For optimal results, the bandage should be left on continuously for long periods.

3. The Thermoskin Ankle Wrap has insulating properties that help to generate heat and promote circulation. Combined with the support it offers, this brace is useful in the treatment of arthritic pain, ATFL and CFL tears. The wrap should be worn over longer periods of time to generate enough heat for optimal results.

4. The Thermoskin Ankle Support brace provides heat in addition to offering support for achilles tendinosis, achilles paratenonitis and mid foot pain and discomfort. For thermal treatment to be truly effective, heat needs to be generated continuously for long periods.

Braces for Compression 

1. Compression wraps and bandages help to control swelling lend, lend comfort to injured or weak ankles. The Thermoskin AFG Stabiliser provides light compression and support and can be adjusted for additional compression and support with a figure-8 strap under and around the ankle.

2. The Thermoskin AFG Gauntlet offers light compression to counteract swelling and provide support for weak ankles. The gauntlet features a non-slip sole to improve stability and is made from a stable but soft material that contours to the wearer for optimal comfort and extended wearability. This brace should not be worn within 72 hours of initial ankle trauma.

3. The Thermoskin Ankle Support brace can aid in the rehabilitation of ankle and mid-foot injuries requiring moderate compression. This brace is useful for achilles tendinosis, achilles paratenonitis and mid foot pain and discomfort. This brace is made with Trioxon Advantage, a material that's sturdy and tough without being rigid or uncomfortable. This brace can easily be worn inside the shoe as you go about your daily activities.

4. The Thermoskin Sport brace locks the ankle into optimal position in order to prevent injury or re-injury during physical activity. This soft and light brace provides superior over-the-sock compression and support. The Thermoskin Sport brace is not suitable for wear within 72 hours of an acute injury or while sleeping.

Braces for Support 

1. The Thermoskin AFG Stabiliser brace features stabilising inserts that provide additional support for weak and injured ankles. Its figure-8 strap can be loosened and tightened to provide light to moderate support, and the universal design makes it possible to wear on either foot.

2. The AFG gauntlet by Thermoskin offers stabilising support for either foot. This brace contours to the ankle for extended support and wearability, and is available in six sizes to ensure a correct fit.

3. The Thermoskin Ankle Defence brace is ideal for medial and lateral ankle injuries. With its rigid support and stabilising straps, it acts to position the ankle in the beneficial 90-degree angle.

4. The Thermoskin Ankle brace offers moderate support for the ankle and is ideal for achilles tendonitis, achilles paratenonitis and mid-foot injuries. The moisture-wicking materials ensure prolonged comfort for the wearer and the contoured design allow you to wear the brace inside the shoe while you go about your normal daily activities.

5. The Thermoskin Sport brace provides advanced stabilisation in addition to overall support and compression for the ankle. This support brace should be worn over-the-sock for lateral ligament injuries but should not be worn within 72 hours of an injury or while sleeping.

6. Thermoskin Ankle Armour brace offers rigid support for medial and lateral ankle ligament injuries. This brace's middle eyelets are very closely spaced to allow the wearer a tight fit that effectively supports the ankle throughout the day.

Braces for Stability 

1. The AFG Stabiliser brace offers light stability that can be increased with the added stabiliser inserts. Its non-slip sole additionally ensures that the wearer's gait is sure and steady. This brace is ideal for weak ankles.

2. The Thermoskin gauntlet offers stabilising support for stiffness in the ankle joint, weak ankles or ankle instability, particularly due to arthritis. It provides a contoured fit for customized relief from Raynaud's disease, arthritic conditions and diabetic neuropathy. Its stabilising properties are ideal for weak ankles.

3. The Thermoskin Ankle Defence's figure-8 straps stabilise the ankle at 90 degrees to reduce the severity and frequency of sports-related ankle injuries. This rigid brace has a low-profile design, which allows the wearer to continue about their daily activities without specialized footwear.

4. The Thermoskin Sport brace should be worn over-the-sock like a shoe. This brace offers advanced stabilisation to help protect wearers during increased physical activity. With a locking figure-8 strap and a seamless arch, this brace provides secure stability without discomfort.

5. The Thermoskin Ankle Armour brace offers stability for medial and lateral ligament injuries. The brace is designed to be rigid for superior stability and protection without adding compression that hinder the muscles from moving freely. This brace is ideal for persons with a history of ankle injuries who are looking for added daily stability.

Braces for Protection 

1. The Thermoskin Ankle Support brace compresses and protects the ankle and mid-foot region to help treat achilles tendonitis, achilles paratenonitis and other common injuries. This brace features a contoured design that allows extended wearability inside the shoe.

2. The Thermoskin Sport brace protects the foot and ankle by locking each into a stable position in order to treat and avoid ligament injuries involving the TFL, CFL, and PTFL. This brace is ideal for periods of increased activity, and should not be worn within 72 hours of injury or while sleeping.

3. The Thermoskin Ankle Armour brace provides premium protection for medial and lateral ankle ligament injuries. This brace is rigid and stable while allowing the ankle muscles to move freely, making it ideal for wearing during everyday activities. The elastic back ensures blood flows unrestricted to the Achilles tendon, and the unique lacing design keeps laces tighter for longer. Check out the chart below for some of our most popular ankle brace options.

Check out the chart below for some of our most popular ankle brace options.


Saturday, September 22, 2018

Preventing & Treating Carpal Tunnel Syndrome




Throughout your life, it’s likely that you’ll experience a range of small injuries that simply get in the way of your daily routine. But even a small bruise or cut can alter the way we go about everyday tasks, so what if something bigger happens? We depend on our hands and wrists to help us perform countless tasks throughout the day.
One of the most frustrating and painful injuries to the wrist is known as carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Carpal tunnel is one of the most common disorders of the upper extremity. It affects approximately 5 percent of the general adult population. It also ranks near the top in the number of work-related injuries.


Causes of Carpal Tunnel 

A nerve in the arm, referred to as the median nerve, runs through an area of the wrist known as the wrist tunnel or carpal tunnel, a narrow passage located in the central portion of the wrist. The median nerve controls some of the thumb muscles and provides feeling to the thumb and most of the fingers. The median nerve can become irritated or compressed, especially when there is swelling. This can result in a feeling of weakness, tingling or numbness in the hand. This feeling is often accompanied by pain and discomfort, which can last for an extended period of time.


Symptoms of Carpal Tunnel

As with many illnesses and disorders, the symptoms of carpal tunnel vary from person to person. Here are some of the more common symptoms that people experience:


  • Numbness, pain or tingling in the fingers or thumb 
  • Numbness, pain or tingling in the arm, which can move up to the elbow 
  • Weakness in the hand 
  • Difficulty holding small objects 
  • Reduced feeling in hand or fingers 




 Risks of Developing Carpal Tunnel

Women are 3 times more likely to suffer from carpal tunnel than men due to generally slighter build and therefore smaller carpal tunnel. Carpal tunnel usually occurs in the dominant hand simply because that is the one that is used the most. The average age of sufferers is between 40-50 years and higher in persons with diabetes or other metabolic disorders also are more likely to suffer.

Carpal tunnel is usually associated with jobs, hobbies or other activities that involve a repetitive motion of the hand or wrist. While it is not confined to a particular occupation, carpal tunnel is very common in assembly-line work and data-entry professions. Here are some of the jobs that are known to be associated with carpal tunnel:



  • Construction worker 
  • Musician 
  • Seamstress 
  • Knitter 
  • Data-entry clerk 
  • Computer operator 
  • Hairdresser 



Carpal Tunnel Prevention

While it may not be possible to totally eliminate carpal tunnel, there are certain things that can be done to reduce the risk of developing it. Simply sitting up straight with the correct posture helps a person’s hands and arms to be more relaxed. When working at a computer, it is important that the keyboard is adjusted so that the wrists are in a relaxed position. In the workplace, stretching and taking frequent breaks may help. Here are some other things that have been known to work:


  • Wearing splints to keep the wrists straight 
  • Keeping hands warm 
  • Redesigning tools and tool handles to fit a worker’s hands better 
  • Rotating jobs among workers 



Home Treatments for Carpal Tunnel

Carpal tunnel can sometimes be effectively treated by medication or surgery. However, most people would prefer to find a treatment that they can use at home. Here are five of the home treatments that have been shown to be effective for carpal tunnel:

1. Wrist and Hand Braces

One of the best things a person can do at home or in the office to relieve carpal tunnel is to wear a
wrist and hand brace. Such braces usually feature a metal splint that is positioned in a specific way to provide support and protect the hand and wrist from further damage. In addition to carpal tunnel, these types of braces also work well for sprains and overused or weak wrists, plus they promote increased circulation, which can help with the recovery process. Some wrist and hand braces have a built-in heat retention for increased circulation.


2.  Hand Exercises

Exercises have been shown to be an effective home treatment for carpal tunnel. One of the simple ones that seems to work is to lift the hands and rotate them in a circular motion. This improves circulation to the wrist, arms and shoulders. It also may help to move the neck forward and backward.

3. Hot and Cold Treatments

Both hot and cold treatments have been shown to be effective in treating carpal tunnel. When a person’s wrist is aching, an ice pack often helps to reduce the pain and provide some relief. On the other side of the spectrum, using a thermal hand brace with heat retention properties aids in warmth and bloodflow.


4.  Tool handling and cutting devices

When handling tools, it is important to use tools with a stocky handle. This reduces pressure on the
nerves in the hand. If a large diameter tool handle is not available, it can be wrapped with a cloth, cotton gauze or rubberized tubing to make it easier to grip. When using cutting devices, it is important that they remain sharp so that less pressure needs to be applied. The same thing can be said for using a pen or pencil. It is important to grip the writing device using as little pressure as possible.

5.  Vitamin B6

Eating a diet that is rich in vitamin B6 helps to relieve pain and also works to help keep future damage minimized. Foods that are rich in vitamin B6 include green leafy vegetables, whole grains and seafood.

Friday, August 24, 2018

Exercise Balls for Recovery, Strength & Balance

Using a Physio Ball at Home

Physio balls are used regularly in therapy offices to manage pain and help patients recover from weakness or injuries. At home, you can do the same. An inflatable exercise ball is easy and affordable and can help you to recover from back pain, establish muscle tone, improve posture and more.

The reasons an exercise ball is so effective in the treatment and prevention of a range of injuries is because it can be used in so many ways. It strengthens and develops muscles that help to stabilize the spine, it allows you to stretch safely, it takes pressure off joints and it helps you engage in lots of small movements to keep the blood moving.

The exercise ball introduces an element of instability that other types of exercises can't. Whether you simply sit on it or you use it in a more advanced way, using an exercise ball doesn’t just keep muscles engaged, it also increases your awareness of how your body is moving and where it is in space. This awareness is called prioception. Most of us don't actively think about how our bodies relate to the space around us; we turn a corner or bend down to pick something up, all without bumping into walls or furniture. But an injury can change all that.

There is a range of ways in which you can safely use an exercise ball at home to reap the benefits you desire. Let's start with the basics:


Step 1: Sitting & Bouncing Lightly

If this sounds too simple to you, but you haven’t tried it, be sure not to discount just how effective something this basic can be. To start, simply sit on your ball and get a feel for it. You'll immediately notice how much more engaged your core becomes in order to keep your center is gravity. If you're nervous about sitting on a rolling object or you find yourself a bit too unstable, let some air out of your ball. The more inflated your ball is, the harder it will be to keep it directly underneath you.

Finding your center of gravity on an inflatable fitness ball will improve your posture, engage your core and align your spine. Initially, try sitting on your new fitness ball for 5-10 minutes; as you become more comfortable, lightly begin to bounce up and down. Switching your office chair for a fitness ball is a great way to avoid lower back and circulation issues.


Step 2: Your Core

Now that you're comfortable sitting and bouncing on your fitness ball, you can take your daily stability and strength training to the next level. Challenge your balance by purposely changing your center of gravity. With your hands on your hips, tilt your pelvis toward you, pulling your stomach in. By slowly rocking on your exercise ball, you'll engage your core while lengthening the spine. Repeat this balancing stretch ten or more times, with hips rocking side to side as well as back to front.
Once you feel comfortable with this, you can add another challenging layer to your daily workout by moving your hips in continual circles. In one motion without pausing, shift your weight in a circular motion, first clockwise and then counterclockwise. Adding handheld weights increases difficulty.

A basic seated exercise such as this one can be altered in various ways to build balance and improve
proprioception. Working on your proprioception is especially important after an injury, when certain receptors may have become damaged causing input to be misinterpreted.

Luckily, your proprioceptive ability can be strengthened through exercises that will help you get reacquainted with your subconscious senses. There is a wide range of proprioceptive exercises, from strength training to balancing boards. Sitting on a fitness ball is one great way to regain your senses without placing any additional pressure on the affected joint. Practicing more advanced exercises such as rolling an exercise ball up and down a wall using only your back will help you to retrain your body to move in a way that minimizes re-injury.






Step 3: Stretching

One of the most effective and popular stretches a physio ball provides is the lower back stretch. If you've never performed this stretch before, you might want to consider holding on to a steady object such as a desk or a friend for balance. Then, while sitting firmly with both feet on the ground, slowly begin to take small steps away from the ball while lowering yourself downward. As the fitness ball rolls up your back, relax your shoulders to let your spine curve with the shape of the ball. To fully sink into this stretch, move your arms overhead to drape your entire body over the ball while breathing in and out slowly.




Step 4: Extension

Most people, when they think about "core strength" attribute all of the credit to the ab muscles. We tend to forget about the back, specifically the lower back, which receives very little action aside from bending forward. Little of what we do requires any backward bending, and so, we tend to neglect the muscles that help to keep our core in balance.
Regular extension exercises are great for a variety of reasons, but they're not generally a good fit for people who have had any vertebrae fractures, so we recommend that you talk with your physician before beginning any lumbar extension workouts.

When you're ready to give this exercise a try, lie on your stomach over your exercise ball, arms
resting comfortably. By spreading your feet widely, you'll gain more balance. Keeping your hips in contact with the ball, and without the help of your arms, begin to lift your chest off the ball, actively squeezing your shoulder blades together. Lift as high as is comfortable, hold for five seconds, then repeat. Repetitions of 10 will get you started.


Step 5: Abs

Of course, if we're going to talk about actively engaging our core, we can't neglect that all-time favorite: the sit-up. While some of you might groan at the very idea, keep in mind that the nice thing about doing a sit-up on an exercise ball is that your back is fully supported and you can easily adjust this exercise to your own skill level.
To start, sit on the ball as you normally would. Move your feet forward, as with the backstretch, easing the ball up your back until you've reached your shoulder blades. Engage your core and, without pulling on your neck, sit up slightly. Be mindful that you don't walk back and forth with your feet; the rocking motion you experience should originate from your core.


To ensure you're getting the most out of your ball, it's important to choose the proper size for you. There are three common adult sizes available" 55 cm, 65 cm and 75 cm.
Choose a 55 cm ball if you are approximately 155 to 170 cm tall.
Pick a 65 cm ball if you are approximately 171 to 188 cm tall.
And a 75 cm ball if you are taller.

Saturday, August 18, 2018

Identifying & Preventing Circulatory Problems

Causes for Circulatory Insufficiency

Circulatory insufficiency isn't a disease in and of itself. Poor blood circulation occurs as a result of underlying health issues, and you might have already guessed that these can be quite serious.
When blood circulates normally, oxygen and nutrients are carried to every cell of your body in order to sustain you. If circulation doesn’t occur properly, long-term damage begins. The longer you experience circulatory problems, the more your health will suffer.

While it's impossible to completely control all aspects of your health, there are always changes you can make in order to improve the quality and length of your life. For example, if you have a family history of disease or illness, you should consider eliminating the behaviors that have been shown to increase your risk.

Circulatory problems are no different. They can arise from a variety of underlying factors, and most can be kept under control with proper intervention.
Without a checkup from your doctor, it won't be possible to pinpoint the exact cause of your circulatory issues, however, there are several pervasive lifestyle risk factors for developing poor circulation. These are obesity, poor food choices, lack of physical activity, smoking, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

When managed early on, the diseases that can lead to poor circulation are treatable and even reversible. However, left unmanaged, circulatory illnesses will progress and lead to life-threatening complications.


Varicose Veins & Chronic Venous Insufficiency

Improper blood flow might initially be symptomless or be quite obvious. Varicose veins are one of the most obvious signs of improper blood flow. Varicose veins are caused when valves that control blood flow malfunction and circulation becomes insufficient. This malfunction often leads to a secondary condition called chronic venous insufficiency, because oxygen, waste and nutrients aren't properly exchanged.

Risk factors for varicose veins include:


  • Obesity
  • Genetics
  • Pregnancy
  • Standing jobs


Although every person with a standing desk will tout the benefits of working upright, it’s unlikely that anyone’s ever spent eight hours a day, five days a week on their feet in front of a monitor. And that’s actually a good thing because jobs that require excessive periods of standing, such as at a cash register, can lead to CVI, particularly if the person is overweight. Sitting on a fitness ball such as this one is a great alternative to traditional office chairs or standing desks. A fitness ball engages your core and will ensure that you move about regularly while seated. In addition, it’s recommended that you step away from your desk every two hours for a quick stretch.
CVI is a chronic condition that can be treated but is not curable.


Peripheral Artery Disease & Atherosclerosis

Another common cause of poor circulation is peripheral artery disease (PAD), in which blood flow to the extremities is reduced. PAD is often accompanied by a condition called atherosclerosis, where plaque builds up on the walls of your arteries and blood vessels and causes them to harden. Atherosclerosis is directly linked with high blood pressure, smoking and high cholesterol, because these cause damage to the lining of blood vessels. The damage causes plaque to build up, narrowing the artery and impeding blood flow. If the plaque loosens, it can trigger a blood clot to form, which narrows the artery even further.

One symptom shared by most PAD-sufferers is pain, cramping and fatigue in the legs or hips while walking. Unfortunately, many patients do not discover atherosclerosis until an actual blockage has occurred.

Risk factors for PAD and atherosclerosis are:


  • Smoking
  • Obesity
  • Poor diet
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Physical inactivity
  • Diabetes


Blood Clots

Blood clots may sit quietly for long periods of time without causing any real noticeable symptoms at all before dislodging and causing serious pain. Blood clots can be caused by a range of factors, including atherosclerosis, which we already discussed above. Other risks for developing blood clots are:



  • Smoking
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Birth control pills
  • Prolonged immobility


Unlike physical inactivity, prolonged immobility doesn’t refer to a lack of regular exercise, but rather to how long a person sits in one position. That means, even otherwise healthy people can become susceptible to blood clots when they don’t move around regularly.
If you use airline travel for work, you are more susceptible to blood clots and circulatory problems because it's generally much more inconvenient to get up and move around during a flight, especially if you're finding yourself with a steady stream of cocktails and unlimited free movies. Any flight lasting more than 4 hours puts you at risk. It is recommended you move about frequently.


Deep Vein Thrombosis

If a blood clot develops in the veins deep within the body, the condition is called deep vein thrombosis or DVT. Similarly to a superficial blood clot, DVT may be symptomless for long periods of time. However, if a deep-vein clot dislodges, it can travel to the lungs and be life-threatening.
DVT also causes venous insufficiency.

Many of the risks we’ve discussed can be avoided through lifestyle changes. However, some risks, such as diabetes, can only be managed.

Diabetes

If you have Type 1 diabetes and your body cannot make insulin, it’s vital to check your blood sugar often, eat the right foods to avoid blood sugar spikes and inject insulin when needed.
Remember that insulin isn’t a magic ingredient. A lifetime of repeated exposure to high blood sugar will ultimately cause irreparable damage to blood vessels, putting you at a much higher risk of a heart attack or stroke. Maintaining a healthy diet is a vital part of diabetes management.

Circulatory issues can present in a variety of ways and sometimes not at all. Knowing your risks is half the battle.

Symptoms if Circulatory Insufficiency Illnesses

We've all woken up to a tingling arm after sleeping on our side for too long, or had that pesky pin-and-needle feeling take the skip out of our step after sitting the wrong way, but when numbness, tingling or pain - particularly in the extremities - are an everyday occurrence, it's time to take a closer look.
Occasional numbness is normal; we temporarily cut off blood supply to fingers or toes by sitting too long or bending the wrong way, but when numbness becomes a part of your everyday life, you may have a circulatory problem.

Treatment for poor circulation is widely varied and may include medications, compression garments and surgery. The best way to ensure a long and healthy life without complications from circulatory diseases is prevention.
To prevent blood clots, PAD, hardening of the arteries and arterial insufficiency:

Exercise
Reduce body fat, particularly in the belly region
Eat healthily
Don’t smoke
Keep blood sugar levels normal
Keep cholesterol and blood pressure low
Take your medications as prescribed
Move about frequently when sitting at work or on a plane

Being aware that certain lifestyle factors automatically increase your risks of developing circulatory illnesses, whether you're predisposed to them or not, should help you make better choices regarding diet, exercise and lifestyle. Knowing your risks, changing your lifestyle and listening to your body can help you avoid irreversible damage from progressive illnesses that manifest as circulatory issues.

Friday, July 20, 2018

Knee Brace Comparison

The Difference Between Common Types of Knee Braces

Sufferers of knee pain know: there's no substitute for the right product. The nature of your knee pain will determine which knee brace is right for you, whether the underlying issue is weakness, overuse or injury. There are several types of braces on the market, all of which function slightly differently. Read on to learn more about the most common knee brace options and how these are designed to alleviate your pain.

Compression Sleeves

Compression sleeves keep swelling at bay, and in conjunction with rest, ice and elevation, they’re an excellent solution during the first few days after an injury. These sleeves apply even compression with the help of Thermoskin's superior 4-way stretch fabric, which is designed to keep a proper fit without sacrificing ventilation.
The Thermoskin compression sleeve can be worn continuously, making it suitable for everyday activities that require a little extra support.
This brace is a great choice for people who have just sustained an injury and have been advised to apply compression, people with mild knee weakness who want to prevent injuries during increased physical activity, and those who suffer from moderate knee pain or weakness on a day-to-day basis.



Alignment Sleeves

This sleeve provides superior stabilisation that a regular compression sleeve just cannot offer. It was designed to reduce movement in order to diffuse the stress normally placed on your leg during everyday or increased movement. By stabilising the patella and the large muscles in the upper leg, this sleeve reduces the chance of injury or re-injury, and provides long-lasting pain relief for those who are taking part in a lengthy recovery.
Because it does not completely restrict movement, the  Cooper sleeve can be worn while running or jogging, during hiking or climbing and a variety of other exercises and everyday activities.
It promotes proper patella tracking where there is instability and provides relief for ACL injuries, jumper's knee, runner's knee and knee pain in growing adolescents also known as Osgood-Schlatter Disease.


Padded Braces

Padded sleeves provide the same compression as non-padded compression sleeves, but offer additional protection for the kneecap. If you experience pain or weakness in the knee, kneeling can be difficult and isn't recommended. Additional pressure on the knee can further the problem and lead to more serious injuries.
A knee sleeve such as the Thermoskin padded knee support will provide additional stability and allow the wearer to kneel comfortably on the job site or while completing projects at home. This brace is also ideal for volleyballers.
Thermoskin braces such as this feature a patented material that insulates to keep joints warm while allowing plenty of air circulation. The wicking capabilities of Thermoskin ensure that the brace can be worn comfortably for extended periods of time for continual support and firm, even compression.


Do I want a brace with a closed or open knee?

In your search for the right knee brace, you probably noticed that, unlike the sleeves above, some braces are designed to leave the patella region open. What is the difference?
Closed braces allow the patella to be free, so to speak. This is preferable if you're dealing with pain directly in this region, where any additional pressure could cause discomfort by rubbing or pushing against an underlying injury. In addition, many open patella braces are designed to provide additional stability or restrict range of motion.


Basic Open-Knee Braces

A simple open-knee brace is one that operates just like a sleeve but doesn’t apply any pressure to the
knee cap. A brace such as this is ideal for patellar dislocations, where the kneecap slips out of its normal position; runner's knee, a condition that usually presents with pain at the front of the knee cap; or pain from growth spurts.
A more advanced version of the open-knee sleeve focuses on correcting patellar tracking instability and pain or weakness from temporary patellar dislocation.



Single & Dual Pivot Braces

Pivot hinge braces provide even more support. The single pivot brace provides exceptional bracing to protect the knee. This is necessary when rehabilitating medial or lateral soft tissue injuries as well as ligament injuries including ACL, PCL and Medial Collateral injuries.
A single pivot brace such as this one utilizes a hinge that bends at one point, in order to prevent hyperextension. The patented technology material keeps the area warm to promote healing of soft tissue injuries.

Dual pivot hinges are capable at pivoting at two separate points, providing exceptional and functional mobility while delivering superior support. A brace such as this is suitable for almost all knee instability issues including weakness from medial and lateral injuries, as well as postoperative ligament of meniscus repair.
Because braces with hinges have straps, they are easy for the wearer to fit and adjust.



Range of Motion Braces

These braces offer stabilising support and severely limit the movements of the patella. They are ideal for athletes who commonly suffer from injuries or dislocations, or for anyone recovering from a knee surgery looking to limit movement.
The range of motion brace keeps the patella aligned during day-to-day movements and sports, encouraging normal patella tracking and gait, and limits use of the leg in order to encourage healing.
The range of motion hinge can be set to the required degree of movement quickly and easily. The Thermoskin range of motion brace can be set to zero, 15, 30 or 45 degrees.

Preventing Knee Injuries

8 Simple Habits for Preventing Knee Injuries

A proactive approach to knee health is always better than a knee injury interfering with your favorite activities. Whether you have injured your knee in the past or want to avoid knee injuries in the future, these tips will help you prevent knee injuries.


Why Is Preventing Knee Injuries Important?
If you’ve ever hurt your knee before, you know how much knee pain can disrupt your everyday life and stop you from enjoying your favorite activities. Depending on the cause, knee pain ranges in intensity from being mildly annoying to completely debilitating. Over time, damage to your knees can decrease your mobility, cause chronic pain and lower your overall quality of life. Fortunately, preventing a knee injury (or reinjury) is actually pretty easy.


1. Practice Mindfulness With Your Body

You can probably recall a time when your gym teacher saw a student struggling and urged him to “play through the pain” or “tough it out.” However, pain is a useful warning sign that something is not quite right with that part of your body.
When exercising, staying aware of your body is key for preventing injury. Paying attention to pain in your knees is particularly important if you have injured one or both knees from over-exertion before. If you are participating in a physical activity and experience stiffness, weakness or problems extending your knee fully, that pain or weakness could be your body signaling that it’s time to take a break.

Be patient with yourself and try not to feel guilty about temporarily slowing down your workout. Taking time to assess what is going on with your body during your workout may be the thing that’ll keep you from being benched for the rest of the season.


2. Adapt Your Exercises & Activities During Recovery

Recovering from a knee injury or starting to exercise again after sustaining a knee injury means that your knees can’t handle as much stress as they used to - and it’s important to know your limits. If your cardio activity of choice is running, swimming freestyle laps in the pool offers a workout that gets your blood pumping without taking a toll on your knees.
There are plenty of alternatives and adaptations available for specific workouts. We know that sometimes, that means giving up a favorite activity, but consider that it’s usually only temporary and you might actually discover a new favorite way of working out in the process.


3. Maintain Proper Form While Exercising

Challenging yourself in the gym is a great way to bring your fitness to the next level. However, increasing weight or doing more reps is only going to help you if you are exercising safely and properly. From squats and lunges to running and weightlifting, proper form is an essential part of preventing injury. Improper form can be the result of muscle fatigue from completing too many reps or inexperience .
If you like pushing yourself to your limits, we commend you. However, you should never sacrifice form for reps. Instead of focusing on speed as you approach total fatigue, focus on maintaining proper form. If you cannot maintain proper form, stop.

If you’re completely sure how to perform an exercise - perhaps you only know the gist of it, and maybe you even feel a twinge of pain as you do the exercise, there are plenty of resources out there to help you. Check out fitness websites and YouTube channels for free advice day or night. Additionally, working with a personal trainer or fitness coach to develop proper form can help you build strength as well as exercise without hurting your knees.


4. Wear A Supportive Knee Brace

It’s no secret that our feet and ankles need proper support for sports, but it’s easy to overlook supportive gear for the knees. If you have experienced a knee injury before, wearing a knee brace for high-impact exercise like running is a wise idea. Wearing a brace will help stabilize your knee so that it stays properly supported as you run and jump. Even if you aren’t engaging in high-impact cardio activities, wearing a knee brace in the gym will help you prevent injury by maintaining your form.


5. Work More Collagen Into Your Diet

When it comes to keeping your knees healthy, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Because our bodies are made of complex, interconnected systems, it’s important to know what our bodies need and be proactive in meeting those needs. Cartilage is a thick, rubber-like tissue in the knee that cushions the bones of joints. When knee cartilage wears down, it can lead to pain, swelling and inflammation. For proper function and optimal mobility in our knees, we need to consume foods that help us maintain (or restore) cartilage. The protein collagen is essential for preserving and regenerating cartilage. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges and grapefruit, bolster collagen production. Mixing collagen powder into drinks or taking collagen supplements are also good options. Plus, collagen is known for its skin-rejuvenating properties, so getting more collagen will help you feel better inside and out.


6. Pay Attention to Your Nutrition

Proper nutrition is important for everyone, especially people who are physically active. Consuming plenty of protein, healthy fats and vegetables ensures that your body has the nutrients it needs for muscle growth, repair and recovery. Strong muscles support healthy joints, thus lowering your risk of injury. Plus, keeping a balanced diet promotes a healthy weight, which puts less strain on your joints.


7. Manage Your Weight With Diet & Moderate Exercise

The more weight your knees have to move, the harder they have to work each day. Maintaining (or getting down to) a healthy weight is one of the best things you can do for your overall joint health, especially for your knees. As much as possible, plan and prepare your meals in advance to stay on top of your nutrition. Using a tracking app or keeping a food journal will help you become more aware of the calories and nutrients that are in everything you eat. Building exercise into your daily routine, such as going for a walk after dinner, gets you into the habit of exercising.


8. Visit Your Doctor For A Check-Up

Still dealing with knee pain despite healthy lifestyle choices and proper exercise? The knee is a complex structure, so plenty of things can go wrong. Sometimes an undiagnosed problem with the bones, ligaments or tendons in your knee is at the root of your sudden knee pain or mobility issues. Making an appointment with your primary care physician may reveal that you have a problem with the bones or joints in your knees that needs medical attention, such as therapy or surgery in order to correct.

Everyday Relief from Foot Pain with Thermoskin Socks

Foot pain from tendonitis, plantar fasciitis or simple overuse injuries can be debilitating. When you experience pain with every step, even everyday activities can potentially be a complex chore. If you suffer from foot pain due to inflammation or overuse, there are treatments that can help you get back to your routine available.

One of these, referred to as R.I.C.E.ing - or resting, icing, compressing and elevating, is a proven system designed to provide immediate and long-term relief from pain due to overuse, injury and inflammation.



Rest


Giving your body an opportunity to recover on its own begins with rest. If you think you’ve sustained a simple foot injury from overuse, such as training for a marathon, allowing yourself time to rest should be step number one of your treatment plan.

If rest or any other at-home treatment don’t seem to be helping, or you feel worse after a few days, it’s time to see a doctor for a more in-depth look

Ice


Icing constricts your blood vessels, which in turn reduces pain as well as swelling in affected areas. Ice treatments are commonly associated with acute injuries such as strains or sprains, but cooling is also highly recommended for any pain from overuse and a range of other chronic conditions. Ice helps control inflammation, reduces muscle cramping and helps to control pain.

Compression


Compression provides support where needed, minimises any swelling that may accompany your pain and decreases comfort so you can still go about your daily routine.

Thermoskin Socks


Thermoskin compression socks provide everyday compression without the use of restrictive bandaging. They work by using breathable, graduated compression fibers that carefully apply pressure in precise areas in order to promote blood flow without sacrificing comfort. Thermoskin compression socks effectively utilize upward compression to support the foot while greatly reducing stress felt by feet and ankles. Unlike other compression socks that utilize indiscriminate overall pressure, Thermoskin compression socks apply compression precisely where your foot needs it most.

Compression socks by Thermoskin are available in three lengths: calf, mid-calf (or crew) and ankle. All lengths utilize the same science to apply support and stimulate blood flow. This helps to promote healing while minimising pain.



Thermoskin products use soft, breathable, moisture-wicking and antibacterial fabrics to prolong comfort and prevent odors. We encourage customers to look closely before purchasing cheaper imitations, which may claim similar benefits but are often made from inferior materials.

These socks provide all-day relief for wearers.

Recommended Products


Calf Compression Socks

This particular sock offers moderate and graduated compression all the way from the ankle to the top of the calf for full lower leg support. These compression socks are ideal for anyone needing relief from plantar fasciitis, achilles tendonities and various other foot and heel complaints.
The firm upward compression in the arch provides relief from pain and fatigue, and swelling is minimised throughout the lower leg, ankle and foot. These socks use silver microbial fibers to prevent odors and feature a footpad at the ball of the foot for extra comfort through proper cushioning.




Crew Compression Socks

Thermoskin crew socks stop mid-calf and are an excellent solution for wearers looking for support and pain relief from plantar fasciitis, general foot and heel pain, pain in the arches and heel spurs. Like all Thermoskin socks, these socks feature proper medical support through the use of high-quality compression materials that help to apply upward compression in all the right areas.







Ankle Compression Socks

Thermoskin Walk-On Plantar FXT Socks are an ideal everyday solution to the problem of common foot, heel and arch pain from plantar fasciitis, overuse or simple sports injuries. Additional cushioning at the ball of the foot provides comfort all day while standing, walking or engaging in other activities.












Like all Thermoskin products, the ankle compression socks are made with only high-quality and functional materials, including silver microbial fibers to prevent odors from occurring.



Thermoskin Walk-On compression socks provide support for the plantar fascia, foot arches and your achilles tendons. Anyone suffering from foot and heel complaints such as plantar fasciitis or heel spurs can benefit from the daily comfortable relief these socks provide.

Use Thermoskin Walk-On compression socks in combination with regular stretching and icing to maximise your benefits.


Preventing Knee Injuries

8 Simple Habits for Preventing Knee Injuries

A proactive approach to knee health is always better than a knee injury interfering with your favorite activities. Whether you have injured your knee in the past or want to avoid knee injuries in the future, these tips will help you prevent knee injuries.


Why Is Preventing Knee Injuries Important?
If you’ve ever hurt your knee before, you know how much knee pain can disrupt your everyday life and stop you from enjoying your favorite activities. Depending on the cause, knee pain ranges in intensity from being mildly annoying to completely debilitating. Over time, damage to your knees can decrease your mobility, cause chronic pain and lower your overall quality of life. Fortunately, preventing a knee injury (or reinjury) is actually pretty easy..


1. Practice Mindfulness With Your Body

You can probably recall a time when your gym teacher saw a student struggling and urged him to “play through the pain” or “tough it out.” However, pain is a useful warning sign that something is not quite right with that part of your body.
When exercising, staying aware of your body is key for preventing injury. Paying attention to pain in your knees is particularly important if you have injured one or both knees from over-exertion before. If you are participating in a physical activity and experience stiffness, weakness or problems extending your knee fully, that pain or weakness could be your body signaling that it’s time to take a break.

Be patient with yourself and try not to feel guilty about temporarily slowing down your workout. Taking time to assess what is going on with your body during your workout may be the thing that’ll keep you from being benched for the rest of the season.


2. Adapt Your Exercises & Activities During Recovery

Recovering from a knee injury or starting to exercise again after sustaining a knee injury means that your knees can’t handle as much stress as they used to - and it’s important to know your limits. If your cardio activity of choice is running, swimming freestyle laps in the pool offers a workout that gets your blood pumping without taking a toll on your knees.
There are plenty of alternatives and adaptations available for specific workouts. We know that sometimes, that means giving up a favorite activity, but consider that it’s usually only temporary and you might actually discover a new favorite way of working out in the process.


3. Maintain Proper Form While Exercising

Challenging yourself in the gym is a great way to bring your fitness to the next level. However, increasing weight or doing more reps is only going to help you if you are exercising safely and properly. From squats and lunges to running and weightlifting, proper form is an essential part of preventing injury. Improper form can be the result of muscle fatigue from completing too many reps or inexperience .
If you like pushing yourself to your limits, we commend you. However, you should never sacrifice form for reps. Instead of focusing on speed as you approach total fatigue, focus on maintaining proper form. If you cannot maintain proper form, stop.
If you’re completely sure how to perform an exercise - perhaps you only know the gist of it, and maybe you even feel a twinge of pain as you do the exercise, there are plenty of resources out there to help you. Check out fitness websites and YouTube channels for free advice day or night. Additionally, working with a personal trainer or fitness coach to develop proper form can help you build strength as well as exercise without hurting your knees.


4. Wear A Supportive Knee Brace

It’s no secret that our feet and ankles need proper support for sports, but it’s easy to overlook supportive gear for the knees. If you have experienced a knee injury before, wearing a knee brace for high-impact exercise like running is a wise idea. Wearing a brace will help stabilize your knee so that it stays properly supported as you run and jump. Even if you aren’t engaging in high-impact cardio activities, wearing a knee brace in the gym will help you prevent injury by maintaining your form.


5. Work More Collagen Into Your Diet

When it comes to keeping your knees healthy, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Because our bodies are made of complex, interconnected systems, it’s important to know what our bodies need and be proactive in meeting those needs. Cartilage is a thick, rubber-like tissue in the knee that cushions the bones of joints. When knee cartilage wears down, it can lead to pain, swelling and inflammation. For proper function and optimal mobility in our knees, we need to consume foods that help us maintain (or restore) cartilage. The protein collagen is essential for preserving and regenerating cartilage. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges and grapefruit, bolster collagen production. Mixing collagen powder into drinks or taking collagen supplements are also good options. Plus, collagen is known for its skin-rejuvenating properties, so getting more collagen will help you feel better inside and out.


6. Pay Attention to Your Nutrition

Proper nutrition is important for everyone, especially people who are physically active. Consuming plenty of protein, healthy fats and vegetables ensures that your body has the nutrients it needs for muscle growth, repair and recovery. Strong muscles support healthy joints, thus lowering your risk of injury. Plus, keeping a balanced diet promotes a healthy weight, which puts less strain on your joints.


7. Manage Your Weight With Diet & Moderate Exercise

The more weight your knees have to move, the harder they have to work each day. Maintaining (or getting down to) a healthy weight is one of the best things you can do for your overall joint health, especially for your knees. As much as possible, plan and prepare your meals in advance to stay on top of your nutrition. Using a tracking app or keeping a food journal will help you become more aware of the calories and nutrients that are in everything you eat. Building exercise into your daily routine, such as going for a walk after dinner, gets you into the habit of exercising.


8. Visit Your Doctor For A Check-Up

Still dealing with knee pain despite healthy lifestyle choices and proper exercise? The knee is a complex structure, so plenty of things can go wrong. Sometimes an undiagnosed problem with the bones, ligaments or tendons in your knee is at the root of your sudden knee pain or mobility issues. Making an appointment with your primary care physician may reveal that you have a problem with the bones or joints in your knees that needs medical attention, such as therapy or surgery in order to correct.

Friday, July 6, 2018

Keeping pain under wraps



Manage muscle pain and injuries without resorting to codeine

Muscle and joint pain is always a tricky problem to treat. Whether you have a sports injury, arthritis, or Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI), the pain and discomfort that occurs around the clock can be debilitating to your way of life.


What are the current treatments? 



One way doctors treat these conditions is with codeine-based medications. As an opioid, codeine can no doubt provide very effective pain relief, but it’s for the very same reason that it carries more than its share of risks. Side effects such as drowsiness and constipation are common, while other less common reactions can range from very irritating to life threatening. And that’s not even taking into account codeine’s potential for physical dependence.

In many cases, there’s a safer and less intrusive way to treat these conditions. One way that can prove effective is with the use of thermal support wraps. Thermoskin products are leaders in this field, with a range of wraps covering just about every muscle pain site imaginable.


Keeping your pain under wraps


It works like this: Thermoskin wraps are made with an insulative lining that uses the body’s natural body heat along with moisture wicking to keep the area oxygenated. This combines with firm but comfortable compression at the site to promote blood flow, reduce swelling, and supports muscles and joints in their range of movement.

While it can provide relief to sufferers of arthritis and other chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions, these thermal support wraps can shine with helping those with sports injuries get back in the game faster.


Recover the right way 


By providing muscle pain relief, supporting muscles and joints, and guiding your body to the best healing posture, athletes can find themselves running on the road to recovery. As a well-proven product for treating sports strain and injury, Thermoskin in particular has been endorsed by the Australian Physiotherapy Association and the Australian Institute of Sport for years.

Keep in mind that this is all in very strong contrast to codeine-based pain medications, which may block pain, but does little to assist recovery for sports related strain. Also hard to take into account for codeine is its lack of adaptability--doctors can only prescribe more or less, and that codeine hits the whole body. But human bodies are far too unique to fit into one scale.

This is especially true with athletes, who exhibit perhaps the widest range of body types as a group. You have super tall basketballers, built-of-bricks rugby players, small and flexible gymnasts or tough and wiry marathon runners.


Custom made to fit any body type 


Thermal support wraps like Thermoskin offer custom made wraps to suit individuals at the site of pain for more effective management. The service carries a minimal extra charge, but the opportunity for a tailor-made solution is undoubtedly unmissable for athletes eager to get back to 100%.

When it comes to muscle and joint pain management, there’s a lot of value in letting your body tackle the problem.


Tuesday, June 12, 2018

At-Home Treatments for Plantar Fasciitis

If you suffer from foot pain, possibly related to plantar fasciitis, you’re likely wondering where you should turn for answers. If the issue has been ongoing for more than a few days, you might be thinking about scheduling a visit with your doctor.
In addition to seeking professional help, there are a range of at-home methods you should know about. Your doctor will likely prescribe these to help you overcome discomfort and pain associated with plantar fasciitis, but if you’re not sure whether your pain is the result of common inflammation or a more serious injury, we recommend scheduling a visit to your doctor today.

Plantar Fasciitis Overview


Learning about plantar fasciitis is a great first step when learning to figure out how you’ll get this condition under control. Put very simply, plantar fasciitis occurs when your plantar fascia becomes irritated.

The plantar fascia is the tissue on the bottom of your foot that connects your heel to your toes, and it provides support when you walk, run or jump. Irritation of the planta fascia causes sharp pain in your feet when you take the first few steps of the day, or the pain can occur when you stand or walk after sitting for extended periods. The pain you experience can range in intensity but discomfort usually decreases at least somewhat with stretching and movement.


Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis


Anyone can get plantar fasciitis, however, some people are more at risk than others. People who are overweight are at an increased risk because they put extra stress on their feet each day. Additionally, wearing worn shoes that don't provide your feet with the needed support increases your odds of encountering the problem. Plantar fasciitis is also common in runners and other athletes who tend to overuse their feet.
If you know you are at risk, we recommend taking the appropriate steps to safeguard yourself from the condition.

Reducing the Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis


1. Stretching

If you have heel pain when you wake up in the morning, stretching your feet can help. Stretching increases blood flow to your feet and increased blood flow promotes the healing process.
Initially, it’s unlikely that the pain will go away entirely. However, that shouldn’t stop you from stretching regularly as part of a daily routine. Over time, stretching is highly effective and will reduce pain and discomfort noticeably.
You can remain seated or stand up in order to stretch the bottom of your foot.

Seated
Place one leg directly in front of you. With the knee either straight or bent, pull back on the ball of the foot. Hold this position for 10 seconds before relaxing, and repeat the exercise for 10 minutes on both feet. You should feel a firm pull.



Standing
Against a wall, learn forward with both heels firmly on the ground. This stretch is best achieved with one knee forward and bent while pushing through the hips. Hold this position for 10 seconds before relaxing, and repeat the exercise for 10 minutes on both feet. You should feel a firm pull in the foot and the calf.



2. Apply Ice

Since inflammation and irritation cause plantar fasciitis, you can use ice treatments to fight the problem. Ice serves two purposes when it comes to combating the symptoms of plantar fasciitis: Getting the best results requires you to apply ice several times a day for a few minutes.

  • Freeze a bottle of water and roll out the foot
  • Use a regular ice pack wrapped in a towel
  • Use a self-cooling compression bandage such as CoolXChange

3. Maintain a Healthy Lifestyle

The way you treat your body also affects your ability to manage and reverse the symptoms of plantar fasciitis. Placing too much stress on the tissue in your feet can worsen inflammation, so maintaining a healthy weight is a great way to safeguard yourself.
We know that losing weight sometimes means reversing a series of deeply engrained and possibly even lifelong habits. Talk to your doctor before starting a new workout program, and check out our diet blog for important dos and don’ts before taking on a new diet.

4. Spiky Ball Massage

Using a spiky massage ball is an easy, affordable and powerful way to fight the pain and improve your feet’s well-being. Gently rubbing your feet on the spiky massage ball relaxes your muscles and reduces inflammation by simulating the effects of a professional sports massage.


To use the spiky massage ball, place it on the affected area and roll it in all directions for 60 to 90 seconds at a time. You’ll feel discomfort while using the ball because you’re breaking up myofascial tissue, but you should stop if the pain becomes intense.


5. Thermoskin Heel Rite

The Thermoskin Heel Rite splint can take your results to a whole new level, stopping pain and discomfort in their tracks. This foot brace is designed to compress the tissue in your feet and reduce the effects of inflammation all while offering dependable support to improve your healing process. If you want to use this product to manage your symptoms, you should  wear it under your socks for the best results. To apply, simply place your foot into the splint and pull the straps until you achieve a firm fit.



6. Thermoskin Compression Socks

If you live an active lifestyle and need help supporting your feet throughout the day, Thermoskin compression socks could be the answer you’ve been searching for. Thermoskin Walk-On compression socks invite healing by distributing pressure across your foot, therefore combating inflammation. By effectively reducing the stress on your feet, you’ll alleviate the symptoms of plantar fasciitis.
 Unlike some other brands, the Thermoskin Walk-On compression socks boast a breathable design to provide you with even more enhanced comfort. You can wear these socks daily as you go about your routine.

Some Final Thoughts

Plantar fasciitis has the potential to cause a significant amount of pain and disrupt your daily activities - if you don't take action to control the situation. The good news? You can overcome the symptoms of fascia inflammation.
Making healthy lifestyle choices and using proven products that encourage your body's natural healing process can stop and reverse plantar fasciitis today. Continue these at-home methods for at least a week before you determine whether or not they are working for you, and see a doctor if symptoms worsen.